Category Archives: Noble Sports

Cycling Training Plan

Developing a Training Plan

The purpose of this class is to teach you the steps on how to develop your own training plan.  We are not personal trainers here but we have lots of riding and racing experience plus I have read lots of books on the subject.  If you really want to get hard core get a personal trainer they will help you a ton and help you get to your goals faster than any other way.

What are your goals?

  • What are you trying to accomplish, do you just want to go faster, have a century in mind or want to do Lotoja?  Depending on what your goal is will affect how you plan.
  • Begin with the end in mind.  There are several different types of exercises and routines you can do, knowing where you are going will help us pick which to do.
  • I look at training as 3 different animals:   Short distance Road biking under 50 miles, Long distance Road Biking, Insane distance over 100 miles. picture about training goals

The different type of training regiments

These are some common training regiments, think of these like sets when you go weight lifting.  Each one does different things and we’ll help you in different ways.  Before starting these you need to figure out your max heart rate.  The easiest way to do that is, to get a heart rate monitor, bike 10 minutes as fast as you can then rest  5 minutes then do another 10 minutes as fast as you can, the highest your heart goes is a pretty good estimate of your max heart rate.  You can also take your age – 220 but that is a ball park figure

  • Fast Pedal -  This ride should be done on a flat section of road and will go on for about 30 minutes.  Start with at least a 10 minute warm up, then pedal for 1 minute at a 85 to 90 RPM then go to a 95 to 100 RPM, repeat this 2 times (4 minutes total)  then rest 2 minutes, this would make a complete set.  Your heart rate will climb but don’t use it to judge your intensity.  This workout is all about your cadence, focus on that.
  • Endurance Miles -  This is also called base build miles, we want to do these a lot in the beginning of the season.  Find a long ride (at least an hour) and keep your heart rate between 50-91% of your max heart rate the entire time. 
  • Tempo Training is an excellent workout for developing aerobic power and endurance.  This will really help to make your legs stronger.  Keep your gears high (harder) and your cadence low around 75-80
  • Climbing Repeats- Do this on a road with lots of hills, preferably short hills.  Keep your heart rate at 95-97% of max as you pedal, Cadence should be high around 90-100.  Basically you will go up the hill as hard as you can for 2 minutes, then go downhill for a bit, then back up repeat. You can do this on a long hill to; just go up as hard as you can for 2 minutes take it easy for 1 minute, repeat. 
  • Power Intervals – These hurt, but are extremely helpful. Don’t do these more than 2 times a week.  The way these work is you gradually increase your effort for the first 30 seconds until you get to what you feel is your max you can sustain for 2 minutes, then keep it at that max effort for another 1 minute and 30 seconds.  Take your effort down for 2 minutes, repeat.

 

There are more work outs to choose from these are just some very common ones.  I recommend any of Chris Carmichaels books or videos along with the Cycling Training Bible by Joe Friel

cyclisttrainingbiblebookChrisCarmichealbook

 

 

 

 

 

Developing the plan

            Now its time to put it all together.  I normally write out a weekly plan, what rides am I going to do each day what days am I going to rest etc.  On the topic of rest, rest is extremely important, if you start a ride and you are super sore from the last day, take it easy, just do a nice gentle ride.  The worst thing you can do is push it and try to build, soreness is the body’s way of telling you to take it easy.

For short distance rides, do a lot of power intervals, climbing repeats, and fast pedal work outs.  SO here is a basic example of how a short distance work out would go.

Short Distance

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Warm Up, 4 sets of fast pedal, 2 climbing repeats Recovery Ride Warm Up, Tempo Training 10 minutes, 4 Power intervals Recovery Ride Warm Up, 4 sets of fast pedal, 2 climbing repeats Endurance Ride (2 hours) Rest

 

           

 

For Long Distance, do a lot of endurance miles, a lot. Also in Utah you want to do a lot of climbing repeats and more power intervals.

Long Distance

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Warm Up, 2 sets of fast pedal, 6 climbing repeats Recovery Ride Warm Up, Tempo Training 20 minutes, 6 Power intervals Recovery Ride Warm Up, 4 sets of fast pedal, 2 climbing repeats Endurance Ride (3+hours) Rest

 

For Insane Distance, you are going to train very similar to Long Distance, in fact depending on where you are at in your training you will start with Long Distance than work up.

Insane Distance

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Warm Up, 2 sets of fast pedal, 6 climbing repeats Endurance ride (2+ hours) Warm Up, Tempo Training 20 minutes, 6 Power intervals Recovery Ride Warm Up, 4 sets of fast pedal, 2 climbing repeats Endurance Ride (5+hours) Rest

 

Recovery

Your body needs time to recover, the purpose of the recovery ride isn’t to build more muscle or lose more weight, it’s to get the blood circulating in your legs to remove the lactic acid build up.

The key with any work out plan is to adjust it weekly.  If you get sick for a week, this will set you back about 2 weeks, 1 week of being sick and 1 week to recover where you were before you got sick.  You want to be building off what you did the week before.  If you were able to do all the power intervals than add another set.  If you are limited by time, try doing more sets and lest resting time between.  The key is to develop the plan each week and work towards your goal.

 

The grand finale Heart Rate Monitor post

Just like the favorite cowboy hat that we found out the we were wearing backwards, heart rate monitors can be used incorrectly and we may not even notice.

There is almost a guarantee that a heart rate monitor will stay in the “toy-gadget” unless you learn how to make it accurate and most effective towards your goals.

For you to know how the bang for everyone of your bucks here is a list of the 2 most commonly made mistakes thanks to Matt Fitzgerald at Competitor.com:

Mistake 1.) Using the formula 220-Age to determine your maximum heart  rate. We covered this in the last post but it needs to be 205 – (.5 x age). It is important   to get one of the most important measurements right.

Mistake 2.) Using a heart rate monitor for interval (short and fast) work outs. You all know what jet lag is, well there is such thing as cardio lag. If the workout is too short your heart rate monitor will say you are in Paris when your heart rate is on New York time. Just like your body when traveling, you monitor needs time to sync with your heart.

cyclingheartrate

Knowing what you do about heart rate monitors and the benefits as well as limitations we should take to heart (no pun intended) what my mother often told me:start savin!- Dont buy something only because it is the cheapest but because it has what you need. If you buy cheap things that is all you can expect from them.

  • the inexpensive ones will measure your heart rate but most likely won’t include the sensors needed or be compatible with bicycles
  • Garmin products allow for a GPS product as well as a heart rate monitor
  • the difference for men’s and women’s heart rate monitors are the colors
  • When scrolling through the different monitors they show what other products are compatible but most likely aren’t included in the price
  • A good question to ask yourself is if it is important to be able to upload your workout information onto you computer. If so you will need to spend a little more.
  • Garmin, Suunto and Polar are the ones that have an attachment for your bike

garminpolar

suunto

 

And this we come to the end of our Heart Rate Monitor saga. Thanks for coming by to learn more of what we hope was helpful information. If you cant find info on a topic of your interest please pose the question and we will answer it.

 

Why use a Heart Rate Monitor – Part 2

Last post we talked about 3 scenarios when riding your bike that a bike computer with speed/ cadence doesn’t do the trick. Crossing over from road to mountain, weather and road conditions and frequency of workouts.

For all the variations mentioned a heart rate monitor  can be used to asses your workout no matter the conditions. Just because you are peddling slower doesn’t mean that you are  getting any less of a work out.

The heart rate monitor is the most efficient tool in order to measure the intensity of your workout. The frequency and duration of your work out is done quite simply by a stop watch. The other factor is learning how to read and react to the information that the heart rate monitor give you.

“How to use a heart rate monitor” article on Active.com states that “until you learn what the numbers being displayed mean the heart rate monitor is just a “gee wiz” toy. To give the numbers meaning you need a reference point, a heart rate unique to you at a given level of intensity.”

heart rate

 

The numbers you need to know:

  • Functional Threshold Heart Rate (FTHR) – Wear your heart rate monitor to warm up and then run 30 minutes at race pace.
  • Resting Heart Rate- this is easily measured when you first wake up. If done consistently, an increased resting heart rate can mean that you are over training.
  • Maximum Heart Rate (MHR) – Runners World Magazine uses the following formula: 205- (.5 x your age)

 

Why don’t you figure those numbers out and comeback next week for some recommended products as well as commonly made mistakes

Here is a video that Lexus did using a heart rate monitor that we think you will get a kick out of!

 

4 Bike to School Tips

4 Biking to School Tips
    The summer is coming to an end and back-to-school time is nearing. The school routine means parents need to drop kids off and pick them up unless…they ride their bikes to school. Some parents are too nervous to let their kids ride, while for others it means that they need to get their kids or their own bikes repaired and some may just not have taken the time to ride the route with their kids and identify hazards if there be any. Here are some things to consider as you confidently encourage your kids to ride their bikes to school.
kids riding bikes
1. Helmet- It is an absolute necessity that kids have a proper fitting helmet and that they wear it. This might have to start with a proper example from you.
  •  Needs to sit parallel with the ground without sliding forward or backwards
  •  Two finger between your childs eyes and the helmet
  •  when they open their mouths it makes the helmet snug
2. Proper lock- You don’t want to make it easy on your child to not ride their bike because it got stolen.
  •  make sure you teach your kids the proper placement of the lock. All too often can someone be absent minded and lock only the front wheel.
  •  Find a safe place for your child to place the key or get a combo lock with code that your child can easily                        remember.
  •  Go with your child at least once to see where they are going to lock up the bike and show them how
3. Bike Maintenance- Don’t send your child off on an accident waiting to happen.
  •  Check the bike over thoroughly for cracks in the frame, missing bolts and check to brakes
  •  Inspect the chain as well as spray it with a chain lubricant
  •  If it has a flat tire, take the tire off and check for foreign objects before you go pumping it up assuming that it has just been sitting their for a while and that is why it’s flat. By all means teach your children how to change a tire.
4. Ride the routes- frantic children don’t make for very good GPS computers
  • Accompany your children always if you would like or ride with them at least a week so as to make sure they know that way. Avoid intersections whenever possible.
  • Talk to your neighbors to find other kids that could all ride their bikes together
Please email rhopkins@roundhouseracing.com  if there is anything that we left out or additional questions that you have.

3 Ways to Increase your MPH

 Here are a 3 tips that will allow to you boost your abilities to maintain a faster speed for a greater amount of time:
1. ILTs (isolated leg training)
    Its sounds just like what it is. You can take one foot off the pedal and hold it 6 – 12 inches from the bike. This will then force one leg to do the work that both would normally. Doing this will eliminate dead spots. (points in your pedal stroke where there is no force being exerted) You will want to start with 30 second intervals and eventually move to 60 second intervals. Then you can take the drill to the hills when you are used to the flats. If this is that case for you make sure that you have your pedal technique down because you could ruin yourself doing inproper technique up hills.
*this is a norm for riders to do indoor during winter months
2. Eliminate Coasting
   There are more times then we recognize that we are coasting. As a test you can choose a route that is flat and has as few stop signs as possible. Try and do the ride with 30 minutes of non-stop peddling. If or when this becomes easy double the time and maintain the constant power to the peddle.
3. Love what you fear: hills
   For the cyclists that are not looking to improve, hills can become their worst enemy. For those, like yourself, that are looking to improve they are your greatest tool. Hill repeats are a great technique. Heart rate monitors are the way to measure this exercise. Check out this site if you done have one. Pick a hill that takes 3-5 minutes to climb. Do it the fastest you can while staying in Zone 2 and play with the gears to see what helps. If you dont have a heart rate monitor, focus on 80% effort. Spin for a cool down at the bottom of the hill and then repeat. 3-5 times should do it for you.
Here is a video that can give you some more ideas:

Here is the link at the Active article that inspired this post. Please let us know if there is anything that was left out or could answer the questions that you have.

GPS bike computers

The GPS bike computers could definitely be considered extravagant when they first came out. Most people didn’t even have them for their cars and GPS on smart phones were booming. With time the features on the GPS bike computers have evolved and simultaneously the ways to share those features also evolved. In the past 5 years a now popular platform was created that essential is a Facebook for bikers/runners. Strava has tens of thousands of users now that allow a competitive experience without have to be physically at the same place.

Garmin has dominated the GPS bike computer market and has made it very easy to upload your ride. The information that you can retrieve with the use of a GPS bike computer include heart rate, distance, WATTs(the power that is being expended while peddling), elevation changes, weather. Each one of these categories can be extremely helpful in how one can improve their performance.

The Garmin products allow you to upload this information to Strava giving you the ability to compare rides and measure progress. Your rides can be shared and invitations can be made for people to join your ride. Groups can train regardless of the location for an event. You can follow the profile of pros and even ride the same courses and see how you match up.

If a GPS bike computer doesn’t  sound helpful to you then you can try using your smartphone with a Strava app for android or apple. The accuracy of a smartphone will suffer but it will allow you to start your Strava account and see how helpful it is to you and your training efforts.

At Noble Sports we have various Garmin GPS bike computers including the 500. During the month of July Garmin is offering a 50 dollar rebate on the 500 as well. That will put the 500 under $300. Please come into the shop and check one out.

Garmin 500

Hydration part 2- Hot Weather

Hydration

To begin, what is the goal of hydration?

To replace all the fluids that are lost through perspiration.

With that being said it is important to remember that we function very similar to a radiator that you would find in your car. Our body runs at an efficient temperature. When exertion of muscles increases the need for oxygen in the blood we breath harder and our heart beats faster. To ease the strain on the body, we sweat. Unlike a radiator we don’t have a fan attached to us. That is where your bike ride brings another benefit… a cooling stream of air. But with every ounce of sweat that you produce is another ounce that you need to drink.

Just like radiator fluid (which originally was water), one of blood’s functions is:”It regulates our body temperature. When the weather is very warm or during strenuous exercise there will be increased blood flow to the surface, resulting in warmer skin and faster heat loss.” (Medicalnewtoday.com) Seeing the blood is almost entirely water, we need to hydrate.

For maximum efficiency on your ride:

4 hours before: 12-16 ounces of water

2 hours before: 12 ounces of water

During the ride: 12 ounces per hour in cool weather and up to 80 ounces of water an hour in hot weather

(If you are used to intense work outs in the heat, then you can measure your weight before an after a work out and drink that much in water the next time)

It all begins to make sense why most would say that you hydrate the week before seeing that with hydration as a habit you can error on the safe side. Sports nutrition expert Monique Ryan, RD, author of Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes said  

your first priority should be staying on top of your daily hydration,” says Ryan. Research on gym-goers found that nearly half began their workouts in a dehydrated state. “Many people don’t consume enough fluids during the day,” Ryan says. “If you hydrate properly on a regular basis, you won’t need to worry as much about getting dehydrated during a typical moderate ride.” The old eight-glasses-a-day dictum is a good guidepost

Thanks for reading and please let us know your questions

Hydration

Proper hydration can be an issue for most athletes. With dehydration comes the break down of body mass and the rise of our core temperature. With every percent of body mass we lose our heart beats 5 times faster per minute. If our heart rate continues to rise then our performance will be compromised and we can even put ourselves in danger. The advantages of hydration can be dramatic in your ability to perform. Here is a video that talks about the performance advantages of hydration.

Hydration Supplements are products that can be added to your water to enhance the amount of electrolytes. Electrolytes aid in your body’s heart and nerve functions, muscle control and coordination and your bodies ability to absorb fluids. Strenuous exercise will deplete your bodies number of electrolytes.

One dilemma of electrolyte rich drinks is that they also contain plenty of sugar as well. This gives you unneeded calories as well as a bigger mess to clean up in your water bottle or even worse in your water bladder.

Camelback has launched the sugar-free effervescent tablet. The Lemon-lime and Berry flavors are caffeine free while the orange flavor is caffeinated. On tablet can be used for every 24 ounces of water. They come in a container of 10 tablets.

Noble Sports carries the tablets and below you’ll find a couple reviews you can read before you come.

elixir

Mountain Bike Review said “All in all, I really liked Elixir, it was great tasting, was refreshing, easy to use, left no residue, had no overwhelming sugariness, and extended my athletic performance and recovery. The major benefit, outside of the electrolyte replacement, was that is made me drink the required amount of water on a ride

Gear Junkie felt “Overall, I am a devotee to the category of effervescent electrolyte tablets. The small tabs make getting sodium, potassium, magnesium and other performance enhancers into your system as easy as plunking a tablet in water. A final bonus: The sugar-free tablets do not gunk up a water bottle or hydration reservoir like sugary supplements can.

 

Is that really necessary?- triathlon edition

When competing in triathlons there is a majority of equipment that you have collected as you have ran, biked or swam that will be useful. However, specific equipment has been developed specifically for the conditions that exist during a triathlon. Some may be considered luxuries and others necessities. Triathlon suits, triathlon bikes, triathlon bike shoes, triathlon running shoes, triathlon wetsuits and the list goes on. While at the beginning stages the need for all these speciality items my not be apparent; as you experience grows so will your desire for specialized equipment.

Road bike shoes vs. Triathlon bike shoes

While the advantages my not be obvious they definitely exist.

   - There is a strap or pull tab on the back of the shoe as to make pulling the shoe on and off easier

- Instead of multiple straps, the triathlon shoe only has one as to make it much easier to entry and exit

- Strap direction is different as well. Instead of opening the strap towards the bike and risk getting it stuck in the chain the strap opens outward preventing this.

- Much more ventilation in the shoe to allow for wet and bare feet.

roadVtriShoe

 

You can check out triathletestuff.com or watch this video for more of an explanation.

shimanotrishoes

Noble Sports carries the Shimano triathlon shoes in store. Shimano also offers a 60 day trial on their shoes and if you don’t like them then you can get a full refund. Come to the shop and try on a pair to see the difference.

How to not dread the mountains in mountain biking

There are few people in this world that dont enjoy going down a great trail and might even become a little more competitive than normal.

But what if you have to go uphill that erases excitement real quickly not to mention evaporates your desire to race.

To encourage your drive to ride anywhere and even fuel you to participate in the mid week mountain bike race here are some tips:

1. Stay 0n the saddle- there is no better way to build your leg strength and stamina.It also teaches you the importance of body position and the relevance to the traction that your rear wheel is able to hold.

2. Try and try again- If you can get through a certain section without losing traction or feeling like you are going to pass out…start over again from the bottom.

3. Keep your eyes ahead of you- As painful as it might be to keep looking at the hill you have to conquer, when your eyes are ahead you can see critical parts that offer a unique challenge, and scan the line that offers the most grip and the least hassle.

Here is the link to an article that can confirm what I just told you

For more on breathing techniques here is a video that can help out

Come join us tomorrow and every week at the weekly race series at sundance and soldier hollow

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